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District 9

District 9Given that the critically-acclaimed
  District 9 is Directed by rising star Neill
  Blomkamp and produced by Academy
  Award®-winning Peter Jackson (The
  Lord Of The Rings
and King Kong), you
  can expect great things from this film —
  and you will not be disappointed
...”

ALIENS STRANDED IN SOUTH AFRICA is the theme for the $199+ million global box office smash hit Sci-Fi thriller District 9, with an underlying nod to the difficulties surrounding minority races and the disintegration of their society as they are herded into areas that rapidly become ghettoes.

As a spaceship hovers over Johannesburg, the world awaits a close encounter. But nothing happens and eventually the authorities break in and discover a number of insect-like, human-sized creatures that appear to be ill.

The aliens are given help but are consigned to a slum suburb of Johannesburg where they are written off as third class citizens. Subjected to constant harassment from the authorities who question them about their weapons and their agenda, they degenerate into an out-of-control sub-class known as 'prawns', under military rule and controlled by Multi-National United (MNU). Over the twenty years that they are living on Earth, all the aliens want to do is to go home.

Finally, a team of mercenaries led by Col Koobus Venter (David James) arrives to confiscate weapons and destroy eggs before evicting the aliens to relocate them to a facility 200km away from Johannesburg. When Wikus van de Merwe (Sharlto Coplley), a field operative from MNU's Department of Alien Affairs is assigned to oversee the evictions, he makes an astounding discovery that could change all perception of the creatures.

Wikus is befriended by a bright young alien and his father, who is known as Christopher Johnson and who is resisting the authorities. But while carrying out his duties and investigating a strange liquid that Christopher seems to attach great importance to, Wikus becomes infected by an alien virus that will, literally, change his life.

Using a clever documentary style, the story unfolds with fictional interviews and news footage. As Wikus 'goes native', he becomes a wanted man. With everyone turning against him, he experiences the confusion of an alien living in constant fear for his life. Being hunted by his own kind, he has nowhere to hide — so where else should he go but to the one place where nobody would ever look for him: District 9.

The subjects of xenophobia and segregation feature heavily in the film, as Wikus is pursued through the alleys of the dark and dangerous alien shanty town. He is suddenly plunged into a nether world where he falls into the hands of unscrupulous Nigerian gangsters before finding out what it means to be the ultimate outsider on his own planet.

There is only one thing he can do in an attempt to get back to normality. But will Wikus help Christopher to find the missing fluid in order for the alien to get the essential help he needs? Will Wikus get his life back and will the genius young alien be able to help his father with his escape plan?

District 9 is a tongue-in-cheek yet sometimes deadly serious film with minor gruesome, unpleasant and gross moments along with the occasional bad and suggestive language that does not detract from this truly terrific film. The strange, slow start is a necessary build-up to the thrilling, action-packed story beyond. And it is all in the name of magnificent Science Fiction with stunning special effects and gritty realism.

District 9 is a superb sci-fi adventure with a twist and it will keep you firmly fixed to your seat! An outstanding, totally original and creative alien adventure that is absolutely unmissable.

This enthralling, allegorical story of aliens stranded in South Africa features a fine cast of relative newcomers, including: Jason Cope (Doomsday) as Grey Bradnam, UKNR Chief Correspondent, who also acted out the alien known as Christopher Johnson; Nathalie Bolt as Sociologist Sarah Livingstone; and Sylvaine Strike as Dr Katrina McKenzie.

The Original Music is by Clinton Shorter. Produced by Peter Jackson (King Kong, Lord Of The Rings trilogy) with Carolynne Cunningham; Directed by Neill Blomkamp (Crossing The Line, Tempbot). From an original screenplay by Neill Blomkamp and Terri Tatchell. Executive Producers are Paul Hanson, Elliot Ferwerda, Bill Block and Ken Kamins; Philippa Boyens co-produced.

An action-packed, critically-acclaimed sci-fi thriller with a host of groundbreaking special effects, District 9 debuts on DVD and Blu-ray Disc from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment on 28 December, 2009. RRP: Blu-ray: £24.99; DVD: £19.99 | Running Time: Approximately 112 Minutes | Certificate: 15.

DVD Special Features Include: Filmmaker's Commentary | Deleted Scenes | The Alien Agenda: A Filmmaker's Log, Three-Part Documentary. Blu-ray Special Features: As for DVD, but also including Featurettes: Metamorphosis: The Transformation of Wikus; Innovation: The Acting and Improvisation of District 9; Conception and Design, Creating the World of District 9; Alien Generation, The Visual Effects of District 9 | Bonus features exclusive to the Blu-ray Disc include the Interactive Map feature Joburg From Above: Satellite and Schematics of the World of District 9 that allows users to explore alien technology and weaponry, MNU mercenary armoury and more from the film through a series of satellite maps, schematics and photo-real files | Cinechat | movieIQ.

The Blu-ray Disc version of District 9 is BD-Live enabled, allowing users to get connected and go beyond the disc via an Internet-connected Blu-ray player. Download exclusive content, register for rewards, and give feedback by taking part in a survey and more!

"…magnificent Science Fiction… District 9 is … an outstanding, totally original and creative alien adventure that is absolutely unmissable" — Maggie Woods, MotorBar

"…soars on the imagination of its creators" — Peter Travers, Rolling Stone